Digital Footprint: Taylor Edghill

It feels weird stalking someone on social media and actually having the permission, even order, to do so. Yet, besides the bizarre looks I got while working on this assignment in public spaces, I searched the internet for any trace of Taylor Edghill last week. Here’s what I found:

The first thing that came up when I googled “Taylor Edghill” was her deserted Twitter: seven followers, nine tweets, five of them about food, two about the premier of Tarzan. But hey — she tweeted a live picture of Alexander Skarsgård on the red carpet. I’ll give her credit for that.

The next Google results are very strong for a digital footprint: Her profile and a list of her stories on USC Annenberg Media (none of which need to be hided from recruiters!) pops up, after that comes her profile on the old ATVN website with more stories. It’s a very diverse selection of pieces on both websites, some on politics, some on Arianna Huffington, then there’s instagram, fashion, startups. Although her work as an anchor for the daily live broadcast is not directly linked to her name on those websites. Which brings me to the next point: her LinkedIn. Taylor doesn’t have a profile picture or any description besides the note that she’s a USC student. Mysterious.

Besides an otherwise strong professional presence, Taylor’s digital footprint reveals that she seems to enjoy the following: food, the beach, her sorority Kappa Kappa Gamma, and traveling. For high school, she went to Ridley College, a top-notch boarding school in Canada, where she played tennis and field hockey (that’s all still on the school’s website). Later she travelled to Rome and Kenya, where she met the “most amazing people”; next semester she will study abroad in London. She’s smart — made it on to the Dean’s List of Annenberg spring 2015. She has two small siblings, her brother Liam and her “little angel” Ava and grew up in Barbados. That’s all on her Flickr, I’m assuming for the purpose of that “create your own timeline”-assignment we all needed to do for JOUR 210.

And apparently, there’s this thing called “kadooment,” the Barbadian version of Carnival, where you dress up in fancy Brazilian-carnival-only-more-low-key costumes with glitter and gems everywhere. And Taylor participated several times!

I further found proof that Taylor, like most people in 2010, didn’t know how to use Facebook correctly. Unlike others, however, she didn’t care to delete her traces. So this is still on her wall:

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I hated Shakespeare in school, too, Taylor.

Datawrapper Tipsheet

Datawrapper is a great, complimentary data visualization tool. Whether you would like to visualize the latest poll results, election outcomes or survey findings: Datawrapper is the tool to use. It’s easily embeddable on any website through a code automatically generated for you at the end. And the best thing about: It’s so easy to use, even a 9-year-old would get it.

bildschirmfoto-2016-10-05-um-21-55-11With Datawrapper, you can either create maps or graphs. The maps-tool is still in its beta version, so I’m going to focus on the graph visualization tool.

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Datawrapper gives you the option of uploading a CVS file, an Excel file, or you can simply copy and paste your data into the corresponding text box. For now, we’re going to use one of the sample datasets. And since we’re journalists, I decided to go with the “Trust in Media Reporting” sample. You select it, and the data automatically appears in the text box. It might look weird and unorganized at first — but don’t worry about it for now. Simply click on “upload and continue.”

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Now Datawrapper automatically organizes your data in a table. Since this is a sample dataset, the data is, of course, correctly organized. If you have a more complicated dataset, the table might not be correctly generated right away. But no worries: You can transpose the table columns or customize the columns by simply clicking on them. A dialogue field will appear on the left side, providing you with more options to adjust the different columns. Once you’re happy with the way your data table looks, simply click on “Proceed.”

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This is where the fun begins! Datawrapper automatically generates how to visualize your data most efficiently – in this case, it selected stacked bars. (There’s other options, of course, and I’ll go over that later.) Through the dialogue field on the left, you can pretty much adjust the graph however you want.  You can change the colors, descriptions, headline, labels, label alignment, number format, and so on. Just play around with it until you think you’re data is visualized perfectly. If you’re using survey results, it might be a good idea to provide some additional information on how the survey was conducted (sample size, margin of error) in the “Notes” text box under the “Annotate” tab. And, don’t forget: Name the source of your data!

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Since this is a dataset that depicts people’s opinion on something, stacked bars is probably the best way to visualize it. But, as I mentioned above, there’s other datasets that require a different form visualization. Let’s assume you have a dataset on election results, and you want to visualize it to make it more digestible for your readers. Compile an Excel table with the results first. (I used the results from the last parliamentary election in Germany in 2013.)

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Copy your table and insert it into the text box in Datawrapper. Again, it will look somewhat unorganized at first. Upload it and click “Continue.”

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Since these are election results, the best way to visualize them is probably a so-called “Election Donut.” There’s tons of options (as you can see in the dialogue field to the left), but I think this one’s the best for this dataset. Of course you can play around with it for a while and see which chart type works best.

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Let’s throw some color in there!

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Again, there’s many other options to adjust your chart. Use the dialogue field to explore. If you want to emphasize a certain finding in the data results, I suggest going to the “Annotate” tab and highlighting it. Once you’re happy with the way your chart looks, click on “Publish.”

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Now click on “Embed chart on website.” Datawrapper will open a dialogue field that will provide you with a code. Copy it, embed it in your website’s code, and you’re all set.

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FAQs:

Can I save the chart as an image or PDF? Yes, but only if you purchase extra access to Datawrapper (which is not worth it, on my opinion).

Do I have to credit Datawrapper?  No, you don’t. Datawrapper automatically puts its stamp on your chart through the embed code. But credit your source for the data you used.

Is there a maximum amount of charts I can generate for free? Yes, but the maximum is 10,000 per month. So don’t worry about it.

Are news organizations using this? Yes! It’s a great tool, and newsrooms around the world, like “Le Monde”, “The Guardian”, “Washington Post” and “Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung”, are using this tool frequently to visualize data on their websites.

More questions? Simply email hello@datawrapper.de.

Photo Essay: “Salon de Belleza Guadalupe”

 

As Ines Castillo rings up a costumer in her South L.A. beauty salon, her sister Maria colors a woman's hair from black to blond.
As Ines Castillo rings up a costumer in her South L.A. beauty salon, her sister Maria colors a woman’s hair from black to blond.
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The Castillos’ salon is called “Salon De Belleza Guadalupe”, although the sisters are originally from Honduras.
Castillo test a bright pink nail polish on her own nails in order to present her costumer with the exact shade.
Castillo tests a bright pink nail polish on her own nails in order to present her costumer with the exact shade.
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Despite their mostly latino costumers, the Castillos’ salon is decorated with pictures of white men and women portraying varying hairstyle options.
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A sisterly division of labor: Ines is responsible for the manicures, Maria styles their costumers’ hair.
Ines Castillo enjoys a break in between serving customers.
Ines Castillo enjoys a break in between serving customers. She has lived in the United States for 16 years now.

GIF:

When your taco order is ready>>
When your taco order is ready at a classic Vermont Harbor taco truck >>

Bingo:

A woman biking through a side street in Amsterdam, Netherlands.
Motion: A woman biking through a side street in Amsterdam, Netherlands.
Self-Reflection: My image, reflected in an old mirror at a flea market.
Self-Reflection: My image, reflected in an old mirror at a flea market.
Red: Lighting at a Flume concert.
Red: Lighting at a Flume concert.
Blue: Lighting at that same Flume concert.
Blue: Lighting at that same Flume concert.
Hands at work: A beauty salon employee paints her nails bright pink for demonstration purposes.
Hands at work: A beauty salon employee paints her nails bright pink for demonstration purposes.
Delicious/Fashion: My fashionable dressed sister enjoying some delicious Äppler, a bitter cider-like drink famous in Frankfurt.
Delicious/Fashion: My fashionably dressed sister enjoying some delicious Äppler, a bitter, cider-like drink famous in Frankfurt.
A man looking up while he's blowing soap bubbles in Amsterdam, Netherlands.
A man looking up while he’s blowing soap bubbles in Amsterdam, Netherlands.